Dandy suspension revisited

by admin on May 5, 2009

Confession time – the planned work on the trailer was cancelled in favour of taking it out for a couple of nights!

A call to Indespension this morning has confirmed that the mounting bolts for the 500kg and 750kg suspension units are different:

Dandy 500kg suspension

Dandy 500kg suspension fixings

Dandy 750kg suspension

Dandy 750kg Suspension fixings

Clearly not a like for like replacement.

Additionally after some clever trigonometry I have calculated that due to the longer suspension arm on the 750kg unit, were the unit to be mounted centred on the same beam as the 500kg unit the wheel centre would move back approximately 50mm – probably not desirable, although not a complete no-no?

Must admit to being undecided now as to the best course of action. Driving along this weekend with a close eye on the trailer confirmed to me that it does have an element of springyness, so am thinking that the only hassle is the ride height of the trailer… spacers or new units? (or just avoid the sleeping policemen) Watch this space.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Fred moxon May 13, 2009 at 10:41 pm

Hi people bought 2 indespension units off the shelf at the main site near reebock stadium near bolton .reasonably priced.

Richard M-B January 26, 2010 at 12:16 am

Hi
Have this upgrade up and running on a 98C a Dandy Designer
works well , compromise to mounting position puts wheels about 30 mm to rear of trailer.
Effect on noseweight is small, we put weighty awning and 12v battery towards rear
best to photograph from angle rather than side view as it looks different to the 500kg offering
Makes a very useful little unit but really does need the 8-ply R10 wheels now fitted.

Osy Angus May 8, 2010 at 2:39 pm

I’ve recently bought a ’94 Designer to replace our ’89 Dandy 6. When hitched to the towball it sat unacceptably front high and tail low. The reason seems to be that this vintage of Designer has a an original towing height of 345mm while modern towballs are at 400mm also there has been a bit of settlement in the indespension units. My solution was to insert a couple of 40 x 25mm rectangular section spacers between the ‘A’ frame and the hitch plate, effectively dropping the nose by 40mm and creating the spacers shown in the following photos to raise the rear by about 90mm. Result – A trailer that now tows level.

http://ngus.net/~osy/Dandy%206/Suspension%20spacers%20005.jpg
http://ngus.net/~osy/Dandy%206/Suspension%20spacers%20008.jpg

admin May 9, 2010 at 11:03 am

Looks like a well engineered solution – would be interested to see how the wheels look within the wheel-arches as I think this is the correct way to do this as opposed to my “quick and dirty” solution of dropping the towball via a plate…

Kevin April 29, 2011 at 4:07 pm

hello

Is this height of 345mm an actual spec height?
I’ve just added together the radius of a 145 tyre, the vertical component of the trailing arm and 1/2 the thickness of the bar containing the suspension rubber. Doing this I get to within 20mm of this figure which a couple of mounting plates and the offset of the end of the hitch could easily add up to.
So is it a spec height or the theoretical height of the assembly when formed not allowing for the deflection caused by the mass of the Dandy itself?

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